If the Shoe Fits

Stilettos, wedges, pumps, and platform heels for fancy occasions. Feather light sneakers with built in springs for those mile runs in the morning. Foldable flats to pop out of your bag after a long day of work. Flip flops perfect for the beach and walks on the boardwalk. For both men and women, there is a plethora of styles to choose from when embarking on the simple task of buying shoes. However, what many people neglect to realize is that not every shoe is for every person. (Tweet This)

Like Cinderella, a person must wear the right pair of shoes that tailors to their needs. For instance, many people fail to measure their shoe size when buying a new pair of footwear. Instead, they choose to base it off their previous pair of shoes. This is not always accurate, as even adults can have slight fluctuations in their shoe size.  The time of day that one measures their shoe size is also important. Towards the end of the day, most people’s feet are swollen, and measuring too early in the morning will not take into account the minimal normal swelling that occurs throughout the day. In the afternoon, one will obtain their most accurate shoe size, which is especially important when fitting children for shoes.

Three out of every four people in the United States have some form of foot deformity, and that includes bunions, onychomycosis (fungal nails), and ingrown toenails. Most of the time these issues can be attributed to wearing the wrong type of shoes. In order to look fashionable, many women will squeeze into narrow, five-inch heels that look fabulous but leave their ankles begging for mercy after a few hours. As a general rule, one should not wear a shoe that is narrower than the dorsum of their foot. Just imagine what the poor toes are experiencing while being smashed in that narrow toe box. This is especially dangerous for diabetics, as their peripheral neuropathy causes them to lose sensation in their feet and may wear shoes that are too small. Males are guilty of this as well, albeit in a different type of scenario. Designer basketball sneakers advertised to enhance one’s skills on the court are worn by millions of teenage boys. Although these shoes are wide enough, they do not provide proper heel arch height and are lined with material that allows the feet to sweat excessively, providing a reservoir of fungi to grow and take over.

Three out of every four people in the United States have some form of foot deformity, and that includes bunions, onychomycosis (fungal nails), and ingrown toenails. Most of the time these issues can be attributed to wearing the wrong type of shoes. (Tweet This)

When choosing shoes, your utmost concern should be comfort, especially for students and for those on their feet majority of the day (Tweet This). However, at the same time, one does not need to sacrifice style for comfort. Instead of wearing thin stilettos that are detrimental to the spinal cord, or platform heels that risk one taking a tumble, try wearing wedges that are stylish yet more comfortable. Sneaker brands, such as Asics, are great for runners and provide proper heel cup depth and control. New Balance comes in wide sizes and is a popular choice for those with bunions. Flats are not ideally the best shoes to ambulate in for long periods of time, as there is no arch support, but those with a bit of a lift in the heel are fine. If you are still struggling to find comfort in your shoes, try making an appointment with your podiatrist to have custom orthotics molded for you and added to your shoes.  By taking care to wear the proper pair of shoes, you are protecting the most amazing biomechanical machine that man has been blessed with. (Tweet This) With a little modification, one can prevent a multitude of feet disorders down the road. Trust me, your ankles and toes will thank you. 

 

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